NEWS

Hill Smith Art Advisory

& MARS present

LUX

TONY LLOYD

MAGDA CEBOKLI

An exhibition of serene and crystalline paintings by award winning artists Tony Lloyd and Magda Cebokli. Lloyd’s singular meditations on light and atmosphere in mountainous terrains are distillations of time experienced at high altitude. Cebokli meticulously explores light and the structure of space with oscillating frameworks of pure geometry.

25 - 27 November

MEZZ55, 55 Rundle Street, Kent Town

 


 

Art Collector Magazine

The Colour of Space

 


 

The Garden Of Forking Paths

[MARS]

12 OCTOBER - 5 NOVEMBER 2022

MARS Gallery 7 James St Windsor

MARS presents a new exhibition of serene and crystalline paintings by artist Tony Lloyd. The Garden of Forking Paths is a journey through landscapes both real and imagined. Based on photographs taken on recent trips to New Zealand’s South Island, the Berner Oberland region of Switzerland and the Victorian High Country, Lloyd’s works capture essential aspects of these locales, each painting is a distillation of time experienced at high altitude. Some images are singular meditations on light and atmosphere in alpine terrains, from the transparent blue of midday to the darkening pinks and mauves of evening. In other works, the artist subtly manipulates his landscapes, moulding mountains into human profiles and creating visual palindromes. Although based on real places, Tony Lloyd’s paintings portray a world that is more psychologically evocative than it is geographically specific.


OVERVIEW

[MARS]

SEPTEMBER 2021

MARS Gallery 7 James St Windsor


IN TOO DEEP Ep. 72

I had a great conversation with artist and podcaster Jack Rowland.

Listen to it here.

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[MARS]

@SYDNEY CONTEMPORARY

September 2020


Sustaining Creative Workers Initiative

Grant recipient

Regional Arts Victoria


[MARS]

Celebrating 15 years

12-20 December

MARS Gallery 7 James St Windsor


R & M McGivern Prize

Anthropocene

23 November 2019 - 2 February 2020

Mass Movement has been selected for the R & M McGivern Prize. The prize is held every three years, with a different theme each year, the $25,000 acquisitive prize for painting calls for artists across Australia to consider the impact of human habitation on the environment. The winner will be announced 23 November 2019.


Skystone 

from 9 September

State Library of Victoria

North rotunda


Dark Mofo 2019

Chris Henschke: Demon Core

Curated by Tony Lloyd

 


Bayside Acquisitive Art Prize

Bayside Gallery

24 May – 21 July 2019

 


Art Central Hong Kong

[MARS]

27 - 31 March 2019

 


ANALOGUE ART IN A DIGITAL WORLD

RMIT Gallery

07 Dec 2018-19 Jan 2019

How do artists find new content in digital media? How has technology altered the nature of analogue art practices? Analogue art in a digital world, curated by Sam Leach and Tony Lloyd, presents a survey of contemporary artists who use the analogue practices of painting and drawing to create artworks that engage with or are influenced by digital visual culture.

Artists Monika Behrens, Natasha Bieniek, Chris Bond, Andrew Browne, Magda Cebokli, Simon Finn, Juan Ford, Stephen Haley, Michelle Hamer, Kate Just, Sam Leach, Tony Lloyd, Amanda Marburg, Viv Miller, Jan Nelson, Becc Ország, David Ralph, Datsun Tran, Darren Wardle, Alice Wormald.

 


Art Collector Magazine


I N T E R G L A C I A L

[MARS]

25 October - 24 November 2018

“Lloyd’s works are insistently of the here and now – placing us squarely in the present – but speak of time immemorial; of all time.”

Simon Gregg, Director Gippsland Art Gallery

Lost Highways Ex. Cat.

Tony Lloyd is an explorer, of mountains, highways and in his imagination, space. His realist paintings have a cinematic majesty and a dreamlike strangeness to them. They are epic visions of landscapes at singular moments in time; sunrise creeping across a rock face; a car’s headlights illuminating the darkness, a weightless asteroid hovering in empty space.

“In these paintings by Tony Lloyd, the artist evokes the uncanny in a collage of visual elements that don’t quite sit together, and that gives the pictures their palpable sense of eeriness. This is the true other and contemporary art at it’s best.”

Andrew Frost, The A to Z of contemporary art ABCTV

Last year Lloyd spent three weeks hiking through the Swiss Alps looking for new landscapes to paint.

“All the superlative things that have been said about mountains are quite true; that their vastness is humbling, that they have a sense of the numinous, and that they are the embodiment of the sublime.”

The paintings in Interglacial have come out of that time.

It has been five years since Tony Lloyd’s last solo exhibition in Melbourne and this will be his first show at MARS Gallery.

 


Tattersall's Club Landscape Art Prize

Tattersall's Club Brisbane

September 2018

Earlier this year I was invited to participate in the Tattersall's Club Landscape Art prize. I have submitted Near Earth Asteroid with Highway (Eros) for the judges consideration. Four judges form the judging panel; one judge is from interstate, one represents the public gallery administration, one is a practicing artist and the fourth judge is a representative of the Tattersall's Club Committee. The award attracts up to 80 artists to participate each year. The award is acquisitive and the winning entry becomes the newest addition to Tattersall’s Club's art collection. 

 


ART GUIDE

FOCAL POINT: NEW REALIST PAINTING

“Painting is always fictional,” says Tony Lloyd when discussing the links between photography, painting and realism. While the artist is interested in the various realities that can be depicted through paintings, he’s also invested in how photography can be a tool for painting. Lloyd is exhibiting in Focal Point: New Realist Painting, alongside prominent Australian painters: Ben Howe, Camilla Tadich, Matthew Quick, Robin Eley, Shannon Smiley


FOCAL POINT: NEW REALIST PAINTING

Hill Smith Gallery

10 May - 26 May 2018 

"Focal Point is obviously a reference to photography, a very important tool for the realist painter. We often mimic the optics of the camera lens, adding sharp and soft focus to our paintings for effect.

Realism in painting has been around for a long time (paintings don’t look more real than the works of Jan Van Eyck from the 15th century), and Realism has meant different things at different times. Now the term is usually applied to any painting that looks something like a photograph, but in this CGI augmented world, a picture can look realistic without looking like reality.

Many painters like myself use digital technology, we manipulate photographic imagery to plan our paintings. The process of careful observation and translation of pixels into paint is still necessary to create the illusion of realistic objects in realistic space, but we are always looking for new realities to paint. Contemporary visual culture is expanding our notion of what reality looks like, from Instagram to IMAX, from the iPhone to the Hubble telescope, it’s all grist for the mill of Realist painting."

Tony Lloyd


IMAGINE 

Gippsland Art Gallery 

6 January - 18 March 2018

One of the most exciting, ambitious, and beautiful exhibitions ever staged in regional Australia will be the first mounted in the new Gippsland Art Gallery, following a two-year, $14.53 million redevelopment. Titled Imagine, the exhibition of 134 works from 81 local, national, and international artists will take visitors on a journey through five centuries of art making. Cumulatively, Imagine reveals a history of the earth as told through the human imagination, from the fires of first creation through to the science and technology of today and beyond.

Conceived by Gippsland Art Gallery Curator Simon Gregg.


timeFRAME 

JAHM 

3 September - 6 December

This exhibition of works from the collection of Susan Taylor and Peter Jones at the Justin Art House Museum aspires to open a window on a living collection that is still growing and expanding into new areas.

"Tony Lloyd is generally classified as a realist painter, one of the top five in Australia according to Andrew Frost in the latest Art Collector magazine. The attraction to us of his work at this time was not only the precision of the painting, but his selection of particular scenes and their cinematic treatment: lonely roads at night, subways, eerie mountain landscapes. Swerve catches a moment of tension between something that has happened and something that is about to happen, a driver losing control of his vehicle, witnessed only by the deep blue of the night sky through the treetops. VERY Twin Peaks!"


ART MONTHLY

Issue 302 October 2017

 

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